About Us

Ekuatorial is a GeoJournalism site that publishes articles and visualizations related to the environment, covering issues of forestry, marine affairs, climate crisis, biodiversity, and other environmental challenges in Indonesia.

About Us

Indonesia is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. At the same time, is also home to some of the richest ecosystems and natural resources in the world. As economic development increases, Indonesia must also find ways to address environmental challenges that are largely caused by poor urban planning and a development approach that pays little attention to impacts on the environment and society. These include the climate crisis, loss of biodiversity, poor waste management, air and ocean pollution, drought, depletion of water sources, and deforestation.

Ekuatorial, an Indonesia-based geojurnalism site that combines stories with map-based data visualization to provide a scientific context to narrative storytelling, by the Society of Indonesian Environmental Journalists (SIEJ) with the support of nternews’ Earth Journalism Network, an international non-profit organization that provides support for independent media and empowers journalists from developing countries to cover the environment more effectively.

Ekuatorial partners with correspondents, journalists, and SIEJ members across Indonesia to produce stories and articles that prioritize balance, multi-stakeholder perspectives, voices of marginalized groups, gender equality, and solutions.

Our Teams

Advisor

Florence Armein – Forence has over 10 years of experience in media, including radio and television. She co-founded the English language news channel, The Jakarta Globe. Florence currently works as a content coordinator for a non-profit organisation that supports independent media and journalists.

General Manager

Rochimawati (Ochi) – Ochi has been active in journalism since 1997 and has worked for Solops Daily, Satunet Group, M-Web, Depok Monitor Daily, Jogja Daily, Anadolu Agency, BenarNews and Kabarsoutheastasia. Ochi is currently an editor at Viva.do.id and Chairwoman of the Society of Indonesian Environmental Journalists (SIEJ).

Editorial

Adi Marsiela (Editor-in-Chief) – Adi worked Suara Pembaruan since 2003 to early 2021. He also reported for the Jakarta Post and several other news agencies. Currently Adi works as a freelance journalist and is a registered member of the Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) and the Society of Indonesian Environmental Journalists (SIEJ)

Sandy Pramuji (Managing Editor) – Started his journalism career in 2003, Sandy has worked for the Antara National News Agency, The Jakarta Globe daily, Microsoft Network (MSN) Indonesia, and Beritagar.id. Sandy currently works as an editor and freelance writer.

Bhimanto Suwastoyo (Guest Editor) – With more than 36 years of experience as a journalist, Bhimanto has worked at the French news agency Agence France Press, co-founded the English language newspaper and channel, The Jakarta Globe. Currently Bhimanto manages several bilingual online platforms related to the environment.

Story proposal

Journalist may send their story proposal or full article to [email protected]. Proposal or article sent must be an original by the journalist and has not been published on any media. We encourage journalist or contributor to take a look at published articles on Ekuatorial as a reference before sending their proposal or article. Ekuatorial has the full right to edit and publish articles submitted in accordance with journalistic ethics and standards.

This website is supported by Internews’ Earth Journalism Network through a grant from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida). Ekuatorial is fully responsible for its content. Opinions and content published do not reflect the views and positions of Internews and Sida.

Banner image: Fishing boats dock at Kelapa Tuban Beach, Tuban, East Java, 19 November 2019. Based on 2015 report by the National Statistics Agency (National Social and Economic Survey), the largest number of fishermen in Indonesia are in East Java, at around 334,000 people. Credit: Wisnu Agung Prasetyo / Tirto